Procrastinators Are Not Who You Think They Are

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Different groups of people purchase in different ways. It is usual to study shoppers based on criteria like geo-location, demographics, or previously purchased products. But how about looking at their purchase behavior based on how timely they are?

 

Having a purchase panel that you can survey on-the-fly makes shopper group creation a breeze, enabling you to combine claimed data from surveys with behavioral data from receipts. In this particular case, we identified shopper groups of “early birds” and “procrastinators” by asking if they had or had not filed taxes by April 1st.

 

Procrastination is often associated with young millennials. A quick attempt at a google search would show that much.
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To our surprise, nothing could be farther from the truth. Who were the procrastinators? The profile of the procrastinator turned out to be mostly Gen-Xers (50.4%), at the extreme ends of the income spectrum (below $25k and above $125k) with no children. One finding that did align with the laid-back stereotype of the region, is that people on the West coast (47.4%) procrastinate more than those in other regions.

 

What do their receipts tell us about their purchase behavior? Procrastinators likely often find themselves in situations where they need to pick up something quickly from a Drug Store or Convenience Store. Meanwhile, early birds seem to plan their purchases better and tend to buy more at the mass merchandiser channel.

 

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In a curious case of routine dragging, the procrastinators were also more likely to make their shopping trips after 5pm while the early birds preferred to get their shopping done before 3pm.

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When it comes to the brands they purchase, procrastinators may not be buying the brands you might normally associate with slackers. Instead, they showed higher affinities to health-conscious brands like Kind and Nature’s Bounty. Early birds were more likely to purchase brands like Nutella, Totinos, and Funyuns, which, although delicious, are not necessarily associated with a healthy diet.

 

Another curious behavior we noticed while looking across categories was that procrastinators drag their feet when buying Christmas cards—making this purchase the same week of December 25th, while early birds were already done two weeks before.

 

When looking at the household category, it seems like the procrastinators make an effort to turn a new leaf with a New Year’s resolution to clean the house, but they revert to their old habits fairly quickly as they begin spring cleaning later than the early birds.
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Some takeaways for marketing execution are to plan in-store events and promotions earlier in the day to appeal to early birds and later in the day to reach procrastinators. The latter are often late to the game around holidays and other important retail events, with the only exception being Valentine’s Day. Capturing early-week holiday promotions is important, but there is a secondary opportunity when this type of shopper finally makes it to the store.

 

In summary, make sure to re-examine how you perceive generations overall and give extra thought as to how they interact with your brands and categories.

 

As a marketer, are you interested in the “Why” behind some of the behaviors discussed here? Are you curious about which brands in your categories are favored by procrastinators or early birds? Get in touch with us at contactus@infoscoutinc.com and we’ll be happy to help you out!