Lidl Comes to America: A Preview

Lidl retail storefront

Lidl, Europe’s largest discount grocery chain, announced earlier this year it would open its first 20 U.S. stores this summer. The first Lidl stores, primarily in Virginia and the Carolinas, are now set to open their doors on June 15.

The Germany-based grocer already has more than 10,000 stores in 27 countries. Back in 2014, Reuters reported that Lidl planned to open 100 stores in the U.S. as early as 2015. Though the move to the U.S. has been delayed, the official launch date is almost here and their plans for stores on U.S. soil are proving ambitious.

Now that Lidl’s entry into the U.S. market is imminent, what should you know about Lidl? What should you expect? What should you be measuring?

This high-level preview from InfoScout is based in part on our conversations with industry stakeholders and studies of Lidl’s European operations. After the launch, InfoScout will share data from Lidl’s first week in the U.S. Based on surveys of actual Lidl customers and in-store observations, we’ll start forming initial assessments of areas in which competitors could struggle, as well as areas in which Lidl may need to improve. Using InfoScout’s proprietary mobile apps, we’ll begin capturing receipt images and data on day one so we can begin to gain a better understanding of purchase behavior and Lidl’s impact on the grocery sector.

What We’re Hearing about Lidl

Lidl’s American stores are expected to be about twice the size of Aldi or Trader Joe’s stores (about 36,000 square feet), but with more than enough space to offer the basics you would expect from a grocery store.

In Europe, Lidl carries mostly private-label brands. We’ve heard from the supplier community that Lidl is engaging some national brands and we’ve seen pictures of private-label product, but the assortment is still unknown. It’s possible they will have an unconventional, rotational product assortment rather than static. In other words, products are on shelves for a limited time and replaced by something similar. What we are certain of comes from an email campaign they sent to customers this month that highlights, “handpicked selections of fresh produce, high quality meats, baked goods, and specialty items.”
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Lidl continues to pursue real estate aggressively with a long-term plan in mind. With potentially 500-1,000 stores on the longer term horizon, we can expect new stores opening from New Jersey to Georgia by 2018. In fact, Kantar predicts $9 billion in sales and more than 600 stores in five years. While the first round of openings in the U.S. will occur on the East Coast, Supermarket News is reporting a western expansion into Pennsylvania and Ohio, and stores are already being planned for Texas.

Although Lidl is not expected to engage in price wars, Kantar found that Lidl prices for branded products could be 30% or more cheaper than prices for identical products at Asda, the Walmart-owned, European supermarket retailer. At the basket level, Lidl was 15% cheaper.

Some in the industry are expecting an innovative approach to advertising, with theme-based schemes for short-term discounts. What we do know to be true: before its doors have even opened, Lidl is pushing the rest of the grocery industry to evaluate their pricing and clean up their stores so they’re prepared to compete.

Lidl Metrics You Should Be Watching

Brick-and-mortar grocery stores are struggling with sales for a variety of reasons. Online grocery shopping options continue to emerge, and a variety of retailers, from large discounters to pharmacies to dollar stores, are carrying more and more grocery products. Obviously, there is concern that Lidl will further erode market share and revenue.

At the end of June, InfoScout will provide a detailed report about Lidl’s opening week, based on surveys from actual customers and firsthand visual observations. This data will include everything from customer profiles and perceptions to pricing and impact on the competition:

  • Who are Lidl’s first shoppers in the U.S. in terms of demographics and psychographics? What is the geographic pull of Lidl stores?
  • Where did these folks shop prior to Lidl? Which stores are losing customers to Lidl, and what is the overall impact on American stores thus far?
  • What do shoppers think of the Lidl store format? What are their perceptions of product quality and selection? Are they impressed by the level of customer service?
  • What are shoppers’ initial impressions of Lidl’s prices? How do they perceive pricing at Lidl compared to the competition?

We’re about to find out exactly how much Lidl will affect the grocery sector. Check back with InfoScout at the end of June for a recap of Lidl’s first week, or contact us at hello@infoscoutinc.com to request the latest insights.

The Candy Report: Easter 2017

We’ve seen the Easter displays in stores since the day after Valentine’s Day. Our kids have survived multiple egg hunts. For those of us who are old enough, we’ve waxed poetic about the retro Cadbury TV commercials with the bunny that clucked like a chicken. Now that the Easter basket grass has settled, it’s time to analyze the data to find out who won the holiday.

Through our proprietary mobile apps, InfoScout captured purchase data during the two weeks leading up to Easter. We also surveyed 500 people during Easter weekend based on actual purchases of Easter candy. This data produced a number of interesting insights.

Which Candy Brands Filled the Most Baskets?

InfoScout shopper data tells us that 9% of the population purchased some type of Easter candy, spending an average of $2.26. While Cadbury and Peeps were clearly the two brands purchased by the most shoppers, Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups and Dove Chocolate were the most expensive, followed by Hershey’s and Cadbury.

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But what do people think of first when it comes to Easter candy? When asked what Easter candy first comes to mind, respondents to the InfoScout survey during Easter weekend mentioned Cadbury Eggs, Peeps, and jelly beans above all others.

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Where Did People Buy Easter Candy?

Compared to any product purchased across the United States, we see the strongest index in the Midwest (125) and the least engagement in the West (85) for Easter candy. Interestingly, our data also shows a high “over” index (121) in rural areas of the country, opposite of urban environments (80).

This data confirms that tastes and preferences are not the same for all people and all places. Winning holidays like Easter requires brands and retailers to offer the right products for the right people rather than having the same products in every store.

Walmart and Target Dominate Easter Candy Share of Wallet

Nearly $8 of every $10 spent on Easter candy went to Walmart (40%) or Target (37.9%). In fact, the share of wallet for Easter candy for these two retail giants was nearly 2.5 times higher than their dollar share for any product – clearly Walmart and Target have the right balance of marketing and assortment for Easter!

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Digging into Easter Candy Shopping Trips

Most Easter candy shopping trips were not frantic, last-minute dashes to the store. On average, 17% of shopping trips are for pantry stocking, with more than 20 items per basket. However, this number jumped to 43% when Easter candy was involved, indicating that Easter candy was part of a larger, weekly trip.

Overall, about seven in 10 Easter candy shopping trips involved the purchase of more than 10 items. The basket also sheds light into the type of trip being made as the top five products sharing basket space with Easter candy were greeting cards, energy drinks, writing supplies, vegetables, and soft drinks.

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Our survey confirmed that very few shoppers run out for goodies on Easter morning. About half shop two or three days prior to Easter, while 35% shop three to 10 days ahead of the actual holiday, and 9% shop even earlier.

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This data shows that brands have time to market to and engage with shoppers during the days and weeks leading up to Easter. Most shoppers (77%) plan ahead to spoil their own kids and grandkids, rather than pick up random products at the last minute.gifting-easter-2017

3 Key Takeaways from Easter 2017

1. “One size fits all” is not a winning formula. Product preferences vary, sometimes significantly, from region to region across the country. Understanding these dynamics and preferences can be a major competitive advantage.

2. Lower risk translates to higher sales. The massive share of wallet for Easter candy won by Walmart and Target shows that people are confident these retailers not only have plenty of Easter candy, but also many other products. This allows shoppers to consolidate trips and simplify the shopping experience.

3. Procrastination is not always the rule. When it comes to Easter, shopping is usually a thought-out process and part of larger, weekly trips that occur during the weeks before the holiday weekend. With careful planning, brands have plenty of time to win the holiday.

Holiday Gift Shoppers Approach the Home Stretch

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It seems like an eternity since holiday displays began to pop up in stores in September, and now we’re finally approaching the last shopping days of the holiday gift shopping season. But how much shopping do people have left? Who’s taking gift shopping down to the wire? Where have people shopped, and where do they plan to shop? Have they made lists and checked them twice? Based on receipt data captured by InfoScout’s proprietary mobile apps, we asked approximately 500 holiday shoppers these and other questions during a survey conducted in early December.

How Much Holiday Gift Shopping Is Left?

When asked how far along they are with their shopping, 40% said more than half of their holiday gift shopping was done. 36% had finished about half or less than half of their shopping, while 7% hadn’t even started at the time of the survey.

68% of shoppers who still have work to do plan to purchase their remaining gifts the week before Christmas. A handful admitted that they won’t be finished by Christmas. 18% of survey respondents had already moved on to the wrapping phase because their holiday shopping was completely done. Nearly half wrapped up their shopping (no pun intended) this month, as 31% finished during the first week of December and 15% made their last holiday gift purchase within 24 hours of our survey.

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Although Black Friday still represents the kickoff to the holiday shopping season in the minds of many households, 32% of survey respondents started their shopping before Black Friday, attracted by the expanding retail early-deal landscape.

Which Retailers Are Winning, and Which Stand to Benefit from Last-minute Shopping?

More holiday gift shopping is taking place online as 79% of surveyed shoppers have done at least half of their shopping online. Just 48% have done at least half of their shopping in-store.

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Drilling down a bit deeper into those numbers, 45% of shoppers have made holiday gift purchases from online-only retailers like Amazon. 36% have purchased gifts in a brick-and-mortar Walmart store, followed by the websites of brick-and-mortar retailers such as Walmart.com, Target.com and BestBuy.com (29%). Target’s physical stores finished a close fourth at 28%.

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Interestingly, online channels could lose their advantage during the final holiday shopping weeks as those who still have shopping to do plan to split their time almost evenly between online and brick-and-mortar stores. 36% say they’ll do more or most of their remaining shopping in-store compared to 34% who are more likely to shop online.

Online-only retailers such as Amazon will still be the top destination (40%), with Target and Walmart running neck and neck at 27% each. The websites of brick-and-mortar retailers (24%) drop to fourth for last-minute shoppers.

As for Those Lists…

In this age of mobile devices and apps, 44% of shoppers use a written list for the majority of their holiday purchases. In fact, 31% rely on a mental list to guide their gift shopping, compared to 19% who make a digital list and 6% who use a retailer’s wish list.

About the Data

The data in this article was sourced from a survey completed by 500 omnichannel shoppers from InfoScout’s consumer purchase panel.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

Does Black Friday Shopping Behavior Change When Millennials Become Parents?

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Just when you think you’ve figured out Millennials, they start having children. Now what? Do we have to go back to the drawing board? How do marketers figure out what makes this multitasking, mobile device-juggling, work-life balancing, world-changing generation tick?

Let’s take a deep breath and start the analysis by taking a look at how Millennials shopped brick-and- mortar stores on Black Friday 2016. On a high level, Millennial shoppers were slightly less likely to make a Black Friday purchase (29.2% of households) than the average of all shoppers (32.1%).

Things change in just about every aspect of life when children are factored into the equation, and shopping behavior on Black Friday was no exception. Millennials with kids were more likely to shop in-store on Black Friday (30.0% of households) than Millennials without kids (28.7%).

Among those Millennials who did shop in brick-and- mortar stores on Black Friday, shoppers with kids in tow were bigger spenders. Millennials with kids spent $68.48, compared to $59.17 for those without kids. That’s a kid-friendly boost in spend of about 16%.

So far, it seems surprising that Millennials with kids are more likely to participate in Black Friday compared to Millennials without kids. We looked at the kinds of products being purchased on Black Friday to explain why this might be the case. Below are a list of categories, as well as the relative likelihood of each category being purchased by Millennials with kids compared to childless Millennials.

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As Millennials get older and start having children, gone are the days of using Black Friday to find good deals on that killer 60-inch TV you’ve always wanted. Now, Black Friday is all about the kids – buying toys for holiday gifts and stocking up on parenting necessities.

Having kids also influenced which retailers were visited by Millennials on Black Friday. For example:

  • Walmart was a much bigger Black Friday hit for Millennials with kids (55%) than Millennials without kids (41%). Walmart’s wide assortment across categories probably give it an advantage for families who want that new stereo as well as new clothes for their toddler.
  • Millennials without kids visited drug stores more often than Millennials with kids – 13% without vs. 9% with for CVS, and 11% without vs. 8% with for Walgreens. Seemingly, Millennials without kids are opting for those low-profile Black Friday trips where they can quietly avoid long lines (and perhaps the shrieking cries of newborns).
  • Target, however, did well on all Millennial fronts. Millennial Black Friday shoppers with kids (40%) and without kids (41%) visited Target at a higher rate than all Black Friday shoppers (31%). This makes sense, considering Target’s sales track record for being a Millennial haven.

What does this all mean? Historically, Black Friday represents a unique 24-hour period in American culture when shoppers of all ages seek out bargains on exciting new products like TV sets, stereos, and video game systems. But as some shoppers move on to the next stage of their adult lives, Black Friday becomes more than just a vehicle for self-indulgence; it’s a day to stock up on everyday necessities at heavily discounted prices. So marketers, take note: on a sales day as important as Black Friday, it’s not enough just to know who your shoppers are. Knowing who else is in the household could be enough to move from the red to the black.

About the Data

Using InfoScout’s proprietary mobile apps, we captured purchase data from the receipt images of more than 3,000 Millennials who shopped at brick-and-mortar stores on Black Friday, and more than 77,000 Millennials who shopped at brick-and-mortar stores during the prior 52-week period. Millennial shoppers were also broken down into two groups – those with kids and without kids. Data is based on non-grocery purchases.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

 

PlayStation Takes the Shelf, Xbox Wins the Browser

Looking to squeeze every last drop from an existing generation of consoles, both Microsoft and Sony released minor upgrades leading up to Black Friday in an effort to win the all-important holiday shopping weekend. Xbox trimmed down the device itself while adding support for HDR gaming and Ultra HD Blu-ray players, coining their new console the Xbox One S. PlayStation followed suit on aesthetics, offering the PlayStation 4 Slim with a sleeker design. Sony also looked to capitalize on the 4k TV trend with the November release of the PlayStation 4 Pro, offering enhanced hardware performance and support for 4k streaming.

Driven primarily by a discount at Target for the PlayStation 4 Uncharted Bundle ($212), Sony won the war of the shelves for the 2016 Black Friday Weekend.

Gaming Console Brick & Mortar Share
But when it came to online shopping, the storyline was different. The appetite grew beyond the base 500GB models with the Xbox 1TB Battlefield Bundle, which was marked down to $299 from $349 at major e-tailers, garnering an 18% market share.

Gaming Console Online Sales

Did the push by both Sony and Microsoft to slim down and enhance the aesthetic appeal of the console have an influence? According to our survey to 300+ console purchasers on Black Friday, not so much. Less than 8% of respondents cited exterior console design as an influencing factor for their purchase.

While PlayStation4 buyers had few console+game bundles to choose from, namely the Uncharted 4 Bundle, Xbox had a wider variety (Battlefield, Gears of War, Minecraft). This appeared to bolster sales as Xbox buyers cited the bundled game as a influencing factor in their console decision.

Gaming Console Factors
Stay tuned for our breakdown of the top games from Black Friday 2016!

About the Data

The data in this article was sourced from over 1.2m transcribed brick-and-mortar and online receipts on Black Friday weekend from Thursday evening to Sunday night. This included over 1,500 gaming console purchases at major brick-and-mortar retailers and major online e-tailers. The 2016 analysis was limited to Xbox and PlayStation, purchases including the Nintendo WII and 3DS were not included. 

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

Who Won the Black Friday Turf Battle?

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Did shoppers stay home after Thanksgiving dinner this year or head out for their annual shopping pilgrimage?  Recent data show “The Black Friday” shopping event may be losing its luster. Looking at results from InfoScout, the number of unique retailers visited over Thanksgiving/Black Friday declined slightly, with the typical customer visiting just over two stores.  This suggests that shoppers consolidated their purchases or cut back on the time spent shopping.

As expected, Walmart and Target were the most popular destinations among those who headed out after finishing their Thanksgiving dinner or set their alarm for an early shopping day Friday. In fact, the majority of the top brick-and-mortar retailers mirror Black Friday 2015, with a few notable exceptions:

  • Kohl’s and Home Depot each moved up to become the 3rd and 4th largest retailer in 2016.
  • Club stores and home improvement captured a larger proportion of Black Friday spending compared to last year, as did JC Penney. The struggling retailer was aggressive with Black Friday promotions, which may account for the retailer moving up to 5th place (from 8th in 2015).
  • While there were fewer register rings at Best Buy, the chain’s dollar share dropped more dramatically.
  • Looking beyond the top ten retailers, rankings improved for CVS and The Gap, Inc.

About the Data

More than 300,000 Americans snap pictures of their everyday shopping receipts via InfoScout’s mobile apps. The first 70,000 receipts reported on Thanksgiving Day and Black Friday were analyzed to provide a quick read on which brick-and-mortar retailers were most popular among shoppers.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

Click and Collect Picks Up Steam with Holiday Gift Shoppers

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Click and Collect is gaining traction as more shoppers make purchases online and pick up merchandise in a physical store. People like the convenience of shopping online and having their order ready within an hour in most cases without paying shipping fees.

Long story short, Click and Collect enables the end consumer to get the product they want, when they want, where they want, how they want, and at the price they want.

InfoScout has been tracking the use of Click and Collect, particularly during the 2016 holiday gift shopping season. We surveyed 600 Click and Collect shoppers to see if there has been a shift in adoption, identify the top Click and Collect retailers for holiday gift shopping, and find out how shoppers rate their experiences with Click and Collect.

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Among those shoppers who have used Click and Collect, 38% have already used the service for purchasing and picking up holiday gifts this year. 15% used Click and Collect for the first time during the 2016 holiday shopping season. 51% used the service for the first time within the past 12 months, showing an uptick in adoption.

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There is a clear “Big Three” for top Click and Collect retailers during the 2016 holiday gift shopping season – Walmart (58%), Target (39%) and Kohl’s (26%). JC Penney (12%), Sears (9%) and Kmart (8%) round out the next tier of Click and Collect retailers.

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Perhaps the most encouraging sign for future adoption of Click and Collect is the positive feedback. 99% of shoppers rated their overall experience with Click and Collect during the 2016 holiday gift shopping season as “as expected” or “better than expected.”

92% of shoppers who have already used Click and Collect to purchase holiday gifts in 2016 said they are “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to use this service to purchase additional gifts before the holiday season is done. Looking ahead to 2017, 95% of shoppers are “very likely” or “somewhat likely” to use Click and Collect again when they shop for holiday gifts next year.  These additional Click and Collect purchases pose a significant challenge to retailers in that they have to find creative ways to encourage shoppers to buy impulse and add-on items that typically end up in the cart from general in-store shopping (ex. batteries for the toy helicopter, case for the new tablet, etc.).

There are two important points to consider about this data. First, InfoScout focused exclusively on Click and Collect for the purpose of holiday gift shopping. Our survey doesn’t account for other use cases and time periods in which adoption could be increasing.

Second, the holiday shopping season is far from over, as most shoppers plan to wrap up their shopping during the second week of December. If the intention of shoppers to use Click and Collect again holds true to form, the service could end up having an even greater impact on the 2016 holiday gift shopping season.

About the Data

These insights were powered by InfoScout’s ability to trigger real-time surveys based on observed shopping behavior. The data in this article was sourced from a survey completed by 600 shoppers who have used a Click and Collect service at least once in the past 24 months.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

The Amazon Effect: Why Prime Members Stayed Home on Black Friday

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It’s no secret that online shopping is growing in popularity. It’s also no secret that Amazon is driving and even accelerating that shift from in-store to online. Amazon Prime memberships have increased 23% to nearly 50 million just since last year, according to estimates from Cowen & Co.

With Black Friday 2016 in the books, InfoScout wanted to find out why Amazon Prime members shopped online instead of in-store. We also wanted to gain a clearer understanding of Prime members’ holiday gift shopping habits before and after Black Friday.

We conducted a survey of more than 2,000 Amazon Prime members and found that fewer members were shopping in-store on Black Friday – 59% of respondents this year vs. 65% in 2015. 

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Why did shoppers stay home this year? “Crowds, stampedes, and bad attitudes,” replied one shopper. “Lines and grouchy people” said another. Interestingly, “prices” and “deals” were mentioned far less frequently.

In other words, Prime members who stayed home on Black Friday weren’t bargain hunters. Most were just trying to avoid the long lines and hordes of frantic shoppers.

Will that feeling continue throughout the holiday season? When we asked where their remaining holiday gift shopping will occur, 85% of surveyed Prime members said they will do at least half of their shopping online. Just 15% plan to do most of their shopping in-store.

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However, the fact that Amazon Prime members avoided leaving the house on Black Friday doesn’t mean they’re procrastinating their Christmas shopping. Nearly 25% expect to wrap up their online holiday shopping by the end of November, compared to 20% for in-store purchases.

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Though it may seem contradictory, the popularity of Black Friday appears to be driving shoppers to stay home and shop online. As more holiday gift shopping inevitably shifts online, brick-and-mortar retailers would be wise to start linking in-store purchases with extra discounts for their shoppers to also visit them online (e.g., “Spend $100 in-store and get $10 to spend online). Attracting and retaining these shoppers will be key to competing with their online-only competition.

About the Data

The data in this article was sourced from a survey completed by more than 2,000 Amazon Prime members from InfoScout’s consumer purchase panel.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

 

Why Did Some Shoppers Bail on Black Friday?

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Recent data shows that Black Friday, as a one-day shopping event, is gradually losing impact. Early holiday gift shopping trends for 2016 indicate that more shoppers are taking advantage of Black Friday deals that start early in November and extend into December rather than focusing on a single day. Also, Super Saturday is poised to surpass Black Friday as the busiest shopping day of the holiday season as more consumers, especially millennials, shop later in the season.

InfoScout had a simple question for “defectors” – those who shopped on Black Friday in 2015 but decided to pass on Black Friday this year: Why?

The answers may surprise you.

The natural assumption is that people just don’t want to deal with the madness that has become synonymous with Black Friday. Huge crowds, long lines, and fighting for parking spaces don’t exactly fill people with joy during the most wonderful time of the year.

In fact, this was the top reason why people who shopped on Black Friday in 2014 decided to skip Black Friday last year, as 44% of respondents to last year’s survey said the craziness wasn’t worth it. However, that number dropped to 25% in our 2016 survey.

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This year, more people just couldn’t afford to shop yet, as 26% of survey respondents felt they weren’t financially ready to shop on Black Friday. 39% of defectors plan to shop during the first two weeks of December instead.

The number of defectors who were more likely to have previously shopped for themselves was cut in half (20% in previous years vs. 10% this year), indicating that the financial crunch felt by many shoppers is limiting “treat” purchases.

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We also looked at where defectors shopped last year so we could find out which retailers are losing Black Friday dollars in 2016. InfoScout data shows that Walmart (22.9%) and Target (14.6%) had the largest shares of 2015 Black Friday spend by far and stand to be the biggest losers.

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So why did defectors choose not to shop on Black Friday this year? They didn’t want to brave the crowds, they didn’t feel financially comfortable to spend on gifts yet, and they know that they have the option to purchase gifts well into December, as retailers spread out the holiday shopping season over a longer period of time every year. 

About the Data

These insights were powered by InfoScout’s ability to trigger real-time surveys based on observed shopping behavior. The data in this article was sourced from a survey completed by 388 consumers who shopped on Black Friday in 2015 and did not shop on Black Friday in 2016 (November 25, 2016).

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.

Black Friday’s Top Sellers by Retailer: Did Sony’s PlayStation get boxed out by Microsoft?

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InfoScout’s early read on this year’s top items turned up some usual suspects, along with a few surprises. While Sony’s PlayStation 4 held onto its #1 spot at Best Buy again this year, Microsoft’s Xbox One S Minecraft bundle took the lead at both Target and Costco. Walmart and Sam’s Club shoppers took advantage of whopping 40% discounts off Philips and Vizio Smart TVs to aggrandize their living rooms. But most surprising? Pork Loin ranked first in unit movement at Costco, where shoppers lined up with $8 off instant coupons.

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About the Data
More than 300,000 Americans snap pictures of their everyday shopping receipts via InfoScout’s mobile apps. The first 40,000 receipts reported on Thanksgiving night and Black Friday were analyzed to provide a quick read on this year’s hottest items based on unit sales and dollar sales for each major retailer.

Throughout the 2016 holiday shopping season, InfoScout’s team of researchers will be analyzing real-time data from millions of omnichannel shopping trips. This data is mapped to shopper profile data, instantly triggered surveys and more to provide the richest set of shopper insights available.

For more information, please contact press@infoscoutinc.com.